For many, Tinder is a typical millennial dating app. But for two people who found a connection with each other on the app, it became much more than that.

Alana Duran, a Stony Brook University student, found a new love and a kidney donor in one Tinder match.

Duran, 25, is receiving her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Stony Brook and has been on a waiting list for a kidney transplant. Due to complications from her lupus, Duran suffers from heart disease and kidney failure.

She has been on dialysis for four and a half years, and last May when she got a call for a kidney transplant, she was ill with the flu and could not receive it. Duran kept an open mind, now knowing she was higher on the transplant list than she originally thought.

Lori Interlicchio, 22, is a graduate of American University. She was matched with Duran on Tinder after they both “swiped right.” Duran said she fell in love with Interlicchio’s pictures on Tinder and her bio that read “All of my favorite people are dogs.” Interlicchio described Duran as “incredibly beautiful.” They have been dating for four months now.

Duran said she was unable to receive a kidney donation from anyone in her family, so Interlicchio decided she would act on this problem. When she found out there were no antibodies in her own body against Duran’s, she decided to tell her significant other in an awesome way.

In late November, Interlicchio made up a box of Duran’s favorite things: index cards to study, applesauce, Red Vines, gel pens and Sour Patch Kids, to name a few. At the bottom of the goodie box was a replica of the “You’ve Got A Match” notification on Tinder that Interlicchio and Duran both received when they matched on the dating app.

They were the exact pictures on their profiles. All but one thing was the same: “You and Lori have no antibodies against each other” was in white font across the top. It gave the options “Accept Kidney” and “Stay on Waiting list” instead of the usual “Send Message” and “Keep Playing.” Duran said she was in disbelief.

“I was happy, but I was also overwhelmed because I couldn’t believe that Lori was a match and that she was willing to give me a kidney,” Duran said in an email.

The kidney transplant surgery took place at Stony Brook University Medical Hospital on Feb. 2.

Duran said she is feeling “sore and tired, but also happy.” Both Duran and Interlicchio are recovering.

“There are so many people out there with health problems like Alana’s, and their significant others probably desperately wish they could help them,” Interlicchio said in an email. “How lucky am I to be able to actually do it?”

COURTESY OF ALANA DURAN

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