The Himalayan Club, a club on campus that serves to represent Nepali and Tibetan students, represented their culture through a quick yet impressionable costume and dance act called the “Tashi Sholpa” or “Good Luck” dance. Photo by Heather Khalifa.
The Himalayan Club, a club on campus that serves to represent Nepali and Tibetan students, represented their culture through a quick yet impressionable costume and dance act called the “Tashi Sholpa” or “Good Luck” dance. Photo by Heather Khalifa.

If you have never heard of Didgeridoo, an Australian wind instrument that resembles an oversized wooden pipe, or Zeimbekiko, a popular Greek folk dance, chances are you are not alone.  That is why on Thursday night, Nov. 7, the Office of Multicultural Affairs put together its 10th Annual Multicultural Show & Food Tasting event in Student Activities Center Ballroom A.

The event featured a variety of clubs representing each region of the world: from the Tibetan good luck dances of Asia to the Greek folk dancing of Europe. Each club put on a performance to reflect their culture or region of representation.  Individuals not affiliated with any particular club who nonetheless wanted to showcase their talents also performed at the event. As the performances went on, food sampling of various dishes were simultaneously occurring. From the more savory options of spring rolls, to the more sweet ones like the South Asian dessert firni, the food sampling was just as diverse as the performances.

“The purpose of the event was to spread awareness about the different cultures on Stony Brook campus, and to also gain a better understanding of them in general,” graduate student Allison Harvey said. She is working as an assistant for the Office of Multicultural Affairs, who helped organize the event.

Clubs like the International Student Organization were also heavily involved with planning of this event. ISO was formed two years ago with the intent of helping international students become acquainted with American culture, and to help those students find their place at Stony Brook.

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“We also welcome non-international students, because we know students like to embrace other cultures,” junior political science major Shamil Norshidi, one of the M.C.s of the night, said.

Stony Brook University is one of the most diverse campuses in the state, which is something that students who performed throughout the night, as well as students who attended the event, have both embraced and celebrated.

“If you go to Stony Brook University and don’t embrace all the different cultures around you, it’s like going to six flags and not going on any rollercoasters,” Norshidi said, summing up the sentiment of the night.

Click below to see the rest of the gallery.

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