From left, DNCE guitarist JinJoo Lee, bassist Cole Whittle and lead vocalist Joe Jonas perform at Brookfest on April 30 in the SAC parking lot. ERIC SCHMID/THE STATESMAN

Brookfest 2017 had music by DNCE, Joey Bada$$ and Alison Wonderland, food trucks, t-shirts and a new venue. But it was missing the crowd.

Nearly 3,000 tickets were sold, according to Jim Lo, an administrative assistant for Undergraduate Student Government. But by the time headliner DNCE hit the stage, the Student Activities Center parking lot had no more than a couple hundred students in the crowd.

A few hours into the concert, USG made an effort to appease the small crowd by allowing students in the back section to come forward and join other attendees in the A-section, closer to the stage. Students sprinted toward the A-section hoping to get as close as they could to the upcoming performers, but not all of the students were happy about the change.

“They should have made it a big crowd from the start,” Christine Cho, senior biology major, said. “There was no point in the sections.”

Cho bought a ticket in the A-section for her very first Brookfest, and she was not thrilled when masses of students came rushing toward her section.

“If I could get my $10 refund that would be great,” Cho said.

Throughout the concert, performers noticed the low energy of the crowd.

“Wake up right now,” Alison Wonderland, one of the concert’s musicians, said during her performance.

Wolfie jumped on stage shortly after her command, wearing a white and pink Brookfest shirt. He danced on stage for a few minutes trying to hype up the crowd.

“Now you’re f***ing awake,” Alison Wonderland said after Wolfie exited the stage.

Before Joey Bada$$ hit the stage, he had the crowd chanting his name. Once he arrived, students were waving their arms from side to side and singing along. He even provided a short encore after some attendees called out for one. Several students left afterwards.

DNCE ran on stage to the Star Wars theme song sporting Darth Vader helmets. Once they pulled them off, members of the audience began snapping photos of Joe Jonas and reminiscing about his Jonas Brothers days.

When asked why she was at the concert, Mai Kashihara, freshman environmental design, policy and planning major, replied: “Because I love the Jonas Brothers. I don’t really know Joey Badass.”

While the gloomy weather and proximity to finals may have contributed to the low energy and attendance, the musicians seemed to make the best of it, dancing on stage and performing their music as if to a crowd of thousands.