A cigarrette on the Stony Brook Campus in 2013. The university enacted a smoking ban on Jan. 1 2016. KATE CHRISA/STATESMAN FILE

A cigarette on the Stony Brook campus in 2013. The university enacted a smoking ban on Jan. 1 2016. KATE CHRISA/STATESMAN FILE

Nearly 11 months after the Stony Brook University administration banned the use of all tobacco products on campus, students are starting to notice results.

The Student Health Advisory Council held a third tobacco cleanup effort outside Melville Library on Nov. 13, collecting 2.1 pounds of cigarette butts as opposed to the 14 pounds they collected in November 2015.

“When I see people smoking, I’ll ask them, remind them it’s a tobacco-free campus – and no one has ever not put out their cigarette when I’ve said that and that’s great,” President Samuel L. Stanley Jr. said at a student media briefing earlier this month.

In April, only four months after the Jan. 1 ban was implemented, the Student Health Advisory Council collected 5.75 pounds of tobacco-related waste.

As of October, Stony Brook was one of 14 SUNY schools to implement a smoking ban, according to the American Nonsmokers’ Rights Foundation. State legislators proposed a SUNY-wide tobacco ban in 2012 but the measure failed to pass.

The policy thus far has been peer-enforced, but Stanley said that the university is considering citations for smoking on campus.

“But I think we’ve reached a point now where there are some individuals who really probably know that there is a smoking ban on campus, but continue to smoke on campus,” Stanley said. “And so, I think we’re going to move to a new phase essentially, where we will start issuing citations–potentially–to those people.”

Although Stanley admitted citations might be necessary to eliminate smoking on campus, he said he would prefer to keep the ban peer-enforced. A news release from Nov. 15 stated, “non-compliance with the policy will be treated in the same manner as with other University policies.”

  • Daniel Hammond

    Survey experts agree that survey respondents understate the true extent of their cigarette consumption. If taken as true, the responses in the surveys we examined, would suggest that, on average, only 70 percent of purchased cigarettes were reported to be actually consumed, which strains credulity. The substantial uncertainty surrounding the degree of underreporting of cigarette consumption in survey data necessarily generates large uncertainty about the magnitude of the federal tax receipts lost due to the illicit cigarette trade. Any estimate of federal tax loss based on survey data therefore should be regarded as only broadly indicative of actual receipts lost.4

    Survey experts agree that survey respondents understate the true extent of their cigarette consumption. If taken as true, the responses in the surveys we examined, would suggest that, on average, only 70 percent of purchased cigarettes were reported to be actually consumed, which strains credulity. The substantial uncertainty surrounding the degree of underreporting of cigarette consumption in survey data necessarily generates large uncertainty about the magnitude of the federal tax receipts lost due to the illicit cigarette trade. Any estimate of federal tax loss based on survey data therefore should be regarded as only broadly indicative of actual receipts lost.4

  • Daniel Hammond

    Colleges being forced to go smokefree by Obama Administration

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced an initiative to ban smoking from college campuses last month. This is part of the HHS goal to create a society free of tobacco-related disease and death, according to their action plan released by the HHS in 2010.

    Colleges who fail to enact campus-wide smoking bans and other tobacco-free policies may soon face the loss of grants and contracts from the HHS, according to the plan. Western receives grants through a subdivision of the HHS called the National Institutes of Health, Acting Vice Provost for Research Kathleen Kitto said.

    Obama administration to push for eliminating smoking on college campuses

  • Daniel Hammond

    Look who first invented the Passive smoking Fraud

    Hitler’s Anti-Tobacco Campaign

    One particularly vile individual, Karl Astel — upstanding president of Jena University, poisonous anti-Semite, euthanasia fanatic, SS officer, war criminal and tobacco-free Germany enthusiast — liked to walk up to smokers and tear cigarettes from their unsuspecting mouths. (He committed suicide when the war ended, more through disappointment than fear of hanging.) It comes as little surprise to discover that the phrase “passive smoking” (Passivrauchen) was coined not by contemporary American admen, but by Fritz Lickint, the author of the magisterial 1100-page Tabak und Organismus (“Tobacco and the Organism”), which was produced in collaboration with the German AntiTobacco League.

    That’s fine company are so called public health depts. keep with ehh!

  • waltcody

    So the thing is, if you smoke, you can’t get a higher education, right? And then the Experts can claim that smokers are dumb and only dumb people smoke.

  • bzar

    It’s not about litter. It’s about harassing smokers.

  • Vinny Gracchus

    Rather than citation repeal the b an and instal ash trays…